Monday, December 2, 2013

Psalm 130 verses 1-2

Publican and the Pharisee
Ottobeuron Basilica
The opening verses of Psalm 130 paint a picture of humility.

Psalm 130 Domine non est exaltatum
Vulgate
Douay-Rheims
Canticum graduum David.
A gradual canticle of David.
1 Dómine, non est exaltátum cor meum: * neque eláti sunt óculi mei.
1 Lord, my heart is not exalted: nor are my eyes lofty
2  Neque ambulávi in magnis: * neque in mirabílibus super me.
Neither have I walked in great matters, nor in wonderful things above me.
3  Si non humíliter sentiébam: * sed exaltávi ánimam meam.
2 If I was not humbly minded, but exalted my soul:
4  Sicut ablactátus est super matre sua: * ita retribútio in ánima mea.
As a child that is weaned is towards his mother, so reward in my soul
5  Speret Israël in Dómino: * ex hoc nunc et usque in sæculum.
3 Let Israel hope in the Lord, from henceforth now and for ever.

Notes on the verses

1
V/NV/JH
Dómine, non est exaltátum cor meum: * neque eláti sunt óculi mei.
Sept
κύριε οχ ψώθη μου καρδία οδ μετεωρίσθησαν ο φθαλμοί μου

Dómine (O Lord) non (not) est (it is) exaltátum (lifted/exalted) cor (heart) meum (mine) neque (neither/nor) eláti sunt (they are raised) óculi (eyes) mei (my)

exalto, avi, atum, are  to exalt, i.e., to elevate in rank, power, dignity, or the like; to dignify
cor, cordis, n., the heart, regarded as the seat of the faculties, feelings, emotions, passions; the mind, the soul.
elevo are avi atum - to raise, lift up
oculus, i, , the eye.

DR
Lord, my heart is not exalted: nor are my eyes lofty.
Brenton
O Lord, my heart is not exalted, neither have mine eyes been haughtily raised
Cover
Lord, I am not high-minded; I have no proud looks.

The imagery of this verse is reflected in the parable of the publican and the Pharisee (Lk 18: 9-14), urging us to display humility when we pray in the Church.  Indeed, St Benedict uses this verse to instruct his monks to keep strict custody of the eyes.  Pope Benedict XVI commented:

This is an illustration of the proud person who is described by Hebrew words that suggest "pride" and "haughtiness", the arrogant attitude of those who look down on others, considering them inferior.  The great temptation of the proud, who want to be like God, the arbiter of good and evil (cf. Gn 3: 5), is decisively rejected by the person of prayer who chooses humble and spontaneous trust in the One Lord.

2
V/NV
Neque ambulávi in magnis: * neque in mirabílibus super me.
JH
et non ambulaui in magnis  et in mirabilibus super me.

οδ πορεύθην ν μεγάλοις οδ ν θαυμασίοις πρ μέ

Neque (neither) ambulávi (I have walked) in magnis (in great [things/matters]) neque (neither) in mirabílibus (wonderful/marvellous [things]) super (above) me (me)

ambulo, avi, atum, are to walk, the manner in which one orders one's life
mirabilis, e  wonderful, marvelous; subst., mirabilia, mm, wonders, wonderful works, marvellous things.
magnus, a, um,  great, mighty

DR
Neither have I walked in great matters, nor in wonderful things above me.
Brenton
neither have I exercised myself in great matters, nor in things too wonderful for me.
Cover
I do not exercise myself in great matters which are too high for me.

Verse 2 urges us to turn away from ambition, boasting and an over-inflated sense of our own powers.  St Augustine points to the example of Simon Magus, who "believed that the holy Spirit could be purchased from Christ's apostles for money"; Cassiodorus adds to the list Pilate, "when he said to the Lord Saviour: Knowest thou not that I have power to release thee and power to crucify thee?".


And for notes on the remaining verses of Psalm 130, continue on here.

1 comment:

  1. Thank you! I do very much appreciate and enjoy these posts:-)

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